CIO Finance Summit Europe | October 26, 2017 | London, UK

↓ Agenda Key

Keynote Presentation

Visionary speaker presents to entire audience on key issues, challenges and business opportunities

Keynote Presentations give attending delegates the opportunity to hear from leading voices in the industry. These presentations feature relevant topics and issues aligned with the speaker's experience and expertise, selected by the speaker in concert with the summit's Content Committee." title="Keynote Presentations give attending delegates the opportunity to hear from leading voices in the industry. These presentations feature relevant topics and issues aligned with the speaker's experience and expertise, selected by the speaker in concert with the summit's Content Committee.

Executive Visions

Panel moderated by Master of Ceremonies and headed by four executives discussing critical business topics

Executive Visions sessions are panel discussions that enable in-depth exchanges on critical business topics. Led by a moderator, these sessions encourage attending executives to address industry challenges and gain insight through interaction with expert panel members." title="Executive Visions sessions are panel discussions that enable in-depth exchanges on critical business topics. Led by a moderator, these sessions encourage attending executives to address industry challenges and gain insight through interaction with expert panel members.

Thought Leadership

Solution provider-led session giving high-level overview of opportunities

Led by an executive from the vendor community, Thought Leadership sessions provide comprehensive overviews of current business concerns, offering strategies and solutions for success. This is a unique opportunity to access the perspective of a leading member of the vendor community." title="Led by an executive from the vendor community, Thought Leadership sessions provide comprehensive overviews of current business concerns, offering strategies and solutions for success. This is a unique opportunity to access the perspective of a leading member of the vendor community.

Think Tank

End user-led session in boardroom style, focusing on best practices

Think Tanks are interactive sessions that place delegates in lively discussion and debate. Sessions admit only 15-20 participants at a time to ensure an intimate environment in which delegates can engage each other and have their voices heard." title="Think Tanks are interactive sessions that place delegates in lively discussion and debate. Sessions admit only 15-20 participants at a time to ensure an intimate environment in which delegates can engage each other and have their voices heard.

Roundtable

Interactive session led by a moderator, focused on industry issue

Led by an industry analyst, expert or a member of the vendor community, Roundtables are open-forum sessions with strategic guidance. Attending delegates gather to collaborate on common issues and challenges within a format that allows them to get things done." title="Led by an industry analyst, expert or a member of the vendor community, Roundtables are open-forum sessions with strategic guidance. Attending delegates gather to collaborate on common issues and challenges within a format that allows them to get things done.

Case Study

Overview of recent project successes and failures

Case Studies allow attending executives to hear compelling stories about implementations and projects, emphasizing best practices and lessons learned. Presentations are immediately followed by Q&A sessions." title="Case Studies allow attending executives to hear compelling stories about implementations and projects, emphasizing best practices and lessons learned. Presentations are immediately followed by Q&A sessions.

Focus Group

Discussion of business drivers within a particular industry area

Focus Groups allow executives to discuss business drivers within particular industry areas. These sessions allow attendees to isolate specific issues and work through them. Presentations last 15-20 minutes and are followed by Q&A sessions." title="Focus Groups allow executives to discuss business drivers within particular industry areas. These sessions allow attendees to isolate specific issues and work through them. Presentations last 15-20 minutes and are followed by Q&A sessions.

Analyst Q&A Session

Moderator-led coverage of the latest industry research

Q&A sessions cover the latest industry research, allowing attendees to gain insight on topics of interest through questions directed to a leading industry analyst." title="Q&A sessions cover the latest industry research, allowing attendees to gain insight on topics of interest through questions directed to a leading industry analyst.

Vendor Showcase

Several brief, pointed overviews of the newest solutions and services

Taking the form of three 10-minute elevator pitches by attending vendors, these sessions provide a concise and pointed overview of the latest solutions and services aligned with attendee needs and preferences." title="Taking the form of three 10-minute elevator pitches by attending vendors, these sessions provide a concise and pointed overview of the latest solutions and services aligned with attendee needs and preferences.

Executive Exchange

Pre-determined, one-on-one interaction revolving around solutions of interest

Executive Exchanges offer one-on-one interaction between executives and vendors. This is an opportunity for both parties to make key business contacts, ask direct questions and get the answers they need. Session content is prearranged and based on mutual interest." title="Executive Exchanges offer one-on-one interaction between executives and vendors. This is an opportunity for both parties to make key business contacts, ask direct questions and get the answers they need. Session content is prearranged and based on mutual interest.

Open Forum Luncheon

Informal discussions on pre-determined topics

Led by a moderator, Open Forum Luncheons offer attendees informal, yet focused discussions on current industry topics and trends over lunch." title="Led by a moderator, Open Forum Luncheons offer attendees informal, yet focused discussions on current industry topics and trends over lunch.

Networking Session

Unique activities at once relaxing, enjoyable and productive

Networking opportunities take various unique forms, merging enjoyable and relaxing activities with an environment conducive to in-depth conversation. These gatherings allow attendees to wind down between sessions and one-on-one meetings, while still furthering discussions and being productive." title="Networking opportunities take various unique forms, merging enjoyable and relaxing activities with an environment conducive to in-depth conversation. These gatherings allow attendees to wind down between sessions and one-on-one meetings, while still furthering discussions and being productive.

 

Thursday, October 26, 2017 - CIO Finance Summit Europe

7:00 am - 7:55 am

Registration and Networking Breakfast

 

8:00 am - 8:10 am

Welcome Address and Opening Remarks

 

8:10 am - 8:40 am

Keynote Presentation

The Future of the CIO in the Coming Digital Economy

As more businesses undergo a digital transformation, and as those digital transformations become more ingrained into organizational culture, "Digital" becomes not something unique and different from the business, but a core component of every aspect of the business. As this shift occurs, IT itself faces the very real possibility of no longer being something unique from the business, but instead a component of every aspect of the business. In this world, what role then exists for the CIO? Two clear paths are presenting themselves - one leads to a focus on infrastructure and integration, to keeping the lights on for the digital innovators, while the other leads to information and innovation itself. Knowing which path to choose, how to choose it, and how to see it through will be one of the greatest challenges CIOs of this era will face.

Takeaways:

  • Change is, if not already here, certainly coming and CIOs who don't prepare for the change may not like the results when it arrives
  • Digital transformation is all about connecting enterprise systems to information technology to drive productivity and performance improvements
  • Be prepared to tackle the tasks that no-one wants to do, but everyone needs done; establish relevance to cultivate importance
 

8:45 am - 9:15 am

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Keynote Presentation

Living in a (Way More) Regulated World

Will you be ready for the New EU Privacy rules or is it going to upend Your Digital Transformation plans. Are the CIOs who say the GDPR rules, could actually put them out of business crying wolf? The rule's impact is expected to be global because it affects any company doing business in Europe, whether or not it's headquartered there. Its most controversial element is the penalties, which can be as high as $21 million per incident or 4 percent of the offending company's annual revenues, whichever is greater. Many CIOs have yet to realize the restrictions there will be for using privacy data to big data analysis. CISOs around the globe are asking how will it affect my organisation's security requirements and what do I need to do to comply?

Talking Points:

  • Can current technology manage data effectively enough to comply with auditing and data discovery demands.
  • Will you even be able to locate relevant data at all.
  • How can you determine which data should be saved or deleted based upon regulatory guidelines


 

9:20 am - 9:45 am

Executive Exchange

 

Thought Leadership

Implementing Business Simplification for Success and Growth

Organizational complexity is the single most significant impediment that enterprises are dealing with today; it underlies every business problem enterprises faces and undermines every effort to address them. Organizational complexity is grounded in cumbersome processes, but those poor processes exist only because enterprise applications themselves, including those that are customer facing, as well as those that are not, are complex and unwieldy. To address cultural complexity then, enterprises must eliminate the complexity in their application suite by either building new, buying new, or more efficiently simplifying what they already have. Only by simplification can enterprises eliminate complexity in an efficient and effective way and position themselves for success.

Takeaways:

  • Enterprises live and breath by the speed with which regular transactions occur " turning these into one minute transactions is the key to success
  • Complexity must be eliminated in all applications customer-facing, core internal, and internal supporting alike
  • Building or buying new, less complex applications offers limited gains because eventually all introduce complexities of their own; only simplified applications offer long term, sustained elimination of complexity
 

9:50 am - 10:15 am

Executive Exchange

 

Executive Boardroom

Capacity Planning as Competitive Differentiator

Capacity planning has in many ways become a lost art; common during the era of the mainframe when resources were expensive and time-consuming to procure, the advent of the inexpensive pizza box Windows Server has relegated planning, replacing it with a just buy more mentality. But just buy more creates more problems than it solves as server sprawl, server management, and rampant overprovisioning issues quickly erode any aspect of the value that IT tries to deliver. The lost art need to be rediscovered, to allow IT to get back to offering truly efficient and effective service and service levels. This new era of capacity planning requires new tools that go beyond simplistic benchmarking and trending analysis and instead provides dynamic, flexible, and predictive modeling that allows IT department to truly deploy optimized IT services.

Takeaways:

  • Capacity management may have fallen out of favor but its abandonment has created a wealth of problems for IT and business users the world over
  • In an era of intense innovation pressure, enterprises can no longer afford the inefficiencies of a just buy more approach to capacity provisioning
  • Traditional capacity planning techniques certainly have value but dynamic modeling based on predictive analytics takes things to a whole new level

Executive Boardroom

Proving the ROI of IoT

We all know that ROI calculations, on the surface, are simple mathematical formulas: compare the cost of investment against the value of the return over a given and agreed upon period. But determining exactly what each side of the equation entails and totals is the challenging part, and nowhere moreso than in burgeoning areas such as IoT adoption where use cases are still not clearly understood, and technology costs are highly variable, and all the components related to cost may not yet be quantifiable. The benefits are there, as a number of enterprises are discovering with early pilot programs, but CIOs must enter this area with their eyes wide open to ensure that early IoT implementations have the ROI necessary to keep more complex projects moving forward.

Takeaways:

  • Costs must be carefully quantified for any IoT project " it's not just the sensors, but networking, data, security, etc. spend must be taken into account
  • Similarly, value must be clearly established both in isolation and in comparison to any more traditional methods that could be used
  • Successful IoT projects will be those that can initially leverage existing spend to mitigate costs with successive project piggybacking on earlier investments
 

10:20 am - 10:30 am

Morning Networking Coffee Break

 

10:35 am - 11:00 am

Executive Exchange

 

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Think Tank

Driving an Omni-Channel Experience in Financial Services

Maintaining a consistent client experience is key to ensuring a consistent client relationship, which in turn leads to greater client retention and spend. Maintaining that consistent experience is complicated by the fact that clients now interact with all providers, not just financial services ones, through a variety of channels that can number into the dozens. It is essential to not have just consistency of look and feel across all channels, but consistency of experience, and indeed to allow individual experiences to occur sequentially across all channels.

Takeaways:  

  • Client experience is the primary motivator in client retention and reducing client churn is essential to controlling costs  
  • Client experience degrades when channel experience conflicts or limits client choice or activity so consistency is key  
  • Optimal experience needs a seamless client ?experience ecosystem? that, done well, tightens bonds, reduces costs, and increases spend


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Think Tank

Rise of the Alternate Lender

The banking industry is one that rarely would be described as ?innovative?, with all players seemingly taking a ?what's good for one is good for all? approach where no-one particularly upsets the status quo in anything but small and incremental ways. If the latest evidence from the European market is anything to go by, however, the potential exists that a major shakeup could be in the offing as a host of so-called ?Challenger? banks are bursting onto the scene. Whether from upstart financial services organizations, of companies entrenched in non-related fields such as retail, new entrants are coming to market that having nothing invested in old school processes, not in the semi-competitive landscape that currently exists. Change is coming and Financial Services CIOs need to look to their own house to ensure the people, processes, and technologies are in place to respond to this new threat.

Takeaways:

  • Since the financial collapse of 2008, most consumers have felt an eroded sense of trust with incumbent banks that they do not feel with alternate lenders
  • Challengers are not tied to outdated and expensive products, back-end processes, or technology allowing them to cherry-pick and do so economically


 

11:05 am - 11:30 am

Executive Exchange

 

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Thought Leadership

Become a Change Agent for Business Transformation

Today's modern CIO is embarking on a digital transformation journey exploring radical hybrid IT strategies and leveraging new technologies like Cloud, Social, Mobile and Big Data. However, with 'keeping the lights on' legacy IT components costing nearly 90% of a typical IT budget, how can IT make powerful advancements and lead business change? 

Join this interactive session to learn how award-winning CIOs are successfully tipping the balance by liberating people, time and money from costly ongoing maintenance of their ERP systems including SAP and Oracle, to invest in strategic initiatives that create real-world competitive advantage.

Sponsored by:

Rimini Street View details

 
 
 

11:35 am - 12:00 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Executive Boardroom

Disaster Recovery and Preparing for the Inevitable

Like death and taxes, IT outages are an inevitability whether as the result of power loss, telecommunications outage, or any one of a myriad other potential technical and non-technical issues. In this environment, the savvy CIO knows that what matters most is preparation " being ready for that next outage with an IT infrastructure that is both resilient and flexible and Disaster Recovery procedures that allow for efficient and effective recovery, balancing Recovery Time and Recovery Point objectives with appropriate cost. Disasters happen but with proper planning they don't have to be disastrous to your business.

Takeaways:

  • In the event of a severe outage, businesses without a Disaster Recovery plan are at a significant disadvantage when it comes to recoverability and viability
  • DR planning cannot be an at all costs proposition and appropriate planning must take into account reasonable Recovery Time and Recovery Point objectives
  • Catastrophic outages get the press but are the thin end of the wedge " minor service interruptions are far more common and must be planned for as well

Executive Boardroom

Big Data is all about the Cloud

Of the four disruptive technologies, Cloud and Big Data are the two most top of mind for CIOs, the former because it has the potential to enhance agility and productivity while enabling efficiencies and reducing costs and the latter because it derives insights that drive competitive advantage and increases revenues. As the two continue to grow in relevance and importance to enterprise IT, and indeed to the enterprise as whole, it is only natural that they begin to intersect with the cloud becoming the optimal platform for the delivery of Big Data capabilities, either in-house through the use of IaaS/PaaS or out-of-house through SaaS or Analytics as a Service. IT departments and the CIOs that lead them then need to look to their Big Data and Cloud strategies and determine how best to align them to leverage the advantages where the whole is greater than the sum of the parts.

Takeaways:

  • Cloud computing is a fundamental enabler of big data and advanced analytics capabilities
  • IT can, and must, become a leader in enterprise analytical capabilities by becoming a broker of cloud services
  • Cloud can benefit big data and analytics in a variety of ways with a variety of different delivery models each scaled to individual needs
 

12:05 pm - 12:30 pm

Executive Exchange

 

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Think Tank

Bank Process Standardization and the Era of Banking as a Service

Banks have historically owned and operated all of the various functions related to the delivery of their services and have used these proprietary operations as business differentiators. Increased regulatory oversight has, however, forced standardization on many of these processes. While there have been benefits to the banks as a result (cost control being one of them), this standardization has created a world of service commoditization, not unlike what has been seen with cloud computing and related -as a Service- type offerings. The creation of Banking as a Service-type offerings will open potential revenue streams but require that significant technology hurdles be overcome and those CIOs that get ahead of the curve will set their organizations up for success at the direct expense of their less innovative and capable peers.

Takeaways:  

  • Operational processes, due to transparency and oversight requirements can no longer be considered ?traditional? competitive advantages · 
  • Excellence however is a differentiator and greater facility with a standardized process is a way to regain that competitive advantage · 
  • New revenue channels are imperative for success and finding ways to make revenue off 


Think Tank

Environmental Impacts of Circuits Everywhere

As the sensors that facilitate IoT technologies become smaller and cheaper, we rapidly approach the point where they can be freely dispersed " sown into the ground with crops, scattered into rivers with water flow, and embedded into the environment ubiquitously. However, these devices are still computers and so in many cases toxic to the environment due to their methods of construction. Enterprises will have to carefully weigh the pros of such embeddable technologies against the potential cons of environmental or public perception before considering large-scale adoption, or work with partners that are able to definitively address the potential environmental impacts with non-heavy metal and other toxic materials based technologies.

Takeaways:

  • The promise of IoT for ubiquitous monitoring and sensing is very real and very appealing, but a significant potential downside exists
  • Just because we can doesn't mean we should and enterprises must carefully weigh not just direct costs, but indirect costs of IoT deployments
  • Wise businesses will find technology partners that can mitigate nascent concerns before they become hot button topics
 

12:35 pm - 1:20 pm

Networking Luncheon

 

1:25 pm - 1:50 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Think Tank

Moving from Operations to Transformations

The accepted number for the amount of the IT budget that is tied up in operational spend, in paying to maintain technology that has already been purchased, is 80% leaving only 20% for the IT department to use to drive new projects. Because this level of funding is so low, as much as 70% of IT sponsored projects fail. Yet IT departments are being constantly pushed to be innovative, to find a way to embrace new technologies and leverage them to drive business change. How can you do that when your time, money, and effort goes to just keeping the lights on? Join us as we collectively explore this issue and examine some of the successful strategies that are being leveraged by top IT leaders.

Takeaways:

  • The pressure on CIO's to drive change has never been higher, but fortunately neither has the opportunity to do so
  • Disruptive technologies don't just have the power to disrupt IT for the worse, they have the power to disrupt the business for the better
  • Fortune favors the bold; now is the time to take a leap into new modes of business to break the operational spend stranglehold

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Think Tank

Customer Engagement Trends in Financial Services

As banks around the world, but particularly in North America, struggles to overcome the broken trust with consumers as a result of the 2008 financial crisis, increasingly they are finding that enhanced customer engagement is the lever they must actuate. The complication for the financial services sector however, is that while they are trying to engage more with their customers, those customers are becoming harder to engage as they move to online and mobile banking channels wherever possible. Though these channels offer convenience for the customer, and the potential of cost savings for the bank, they limit interaction. Fortunately for CIOs this makes their role ever more important because interactions, and therefore the opportunity to engage, is occurring ever more through digital channels. As a result, CIOs need to become go-to executives within their organization to facilitate these positive experiences.

Takeaways:  

  • Customer engagement is becoming the single biggest indicator of success for enterprises within the financial services sector  
  • Engagement is made more difficult as consumers increasingly more away from branches and personal interactions  
  • Engagement is a two-way street and banks must be prepared to listen and respond to consumer requests; IT must facilitate that and other processes


 

1:55 pm - 2:20 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Thought Leadership

Planning for a MultiCloud Future

The promise of the cloud is almost beyond compare; infinite computing resources, unmatched reliability and uptime, instantaneous service availability, simplistic self-service and provisioning, and the low-low prices of a buy by the drink model. These are the reasons behind the rush to the cloud that we are currently experiencing, but the wholesale adoption does bring a downside " as more and more capability is moved to the cloud, more and more cloud providers are utilized since, for the most part, each provider offers only a limited suite of services. The MultiCloud environment that creates a new set of challenges that IT leaders need to overcome, notably resiliency, interoperability/integration, and security and compliance through careful planning and the lessons learned from building complex on premise distributed systems.

Takeaways:

  • As enterprises move to the cloud, MultiCloud environments will increasingly become the norm, not the exception
  • Consistent planning and thoughtful architecture will be essential to efficient and effective cloud deployments
  • IT leaders do not need to be alarmed, they've been down the complex environment path before, but they do need to be careful

Sponsored by:

Telstra View details

 
 
 

2:25 pm - 2:50 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Executive Boardroom

Sourcing Enabled Business Transformation

Innovation is more than just a buzzword; it's fast becoming the mantra by which successful companies live. As enterprises strive to become ever more agile, offloading mundane responsibilities to sourcing partners can free the resources to become innovative. While beneficial, this really only scratches the surface as it still requires and relies on your resources to undertake that innovation journey. Partners that can bring innovation wherewithal to the table however, that can bake it directly into the service offering provide a greater opportunity to innovate. Understanding how such services can be integrated into your day to day operations, how they can spring board your innovation efforts, and how they can allow you to become truly transformational is essential to innovation success.

Takeaways:

  • Transformational innovation often requires knowledge, insight, and data that you simply don't have the access to yourself
  • A strong partner not only provides the opportunity to innovate, it also provides the resources to help make it happen
  • By leveraging a single for both operational and transformational initiatives, significant economies of scale can be leveraged making innovation easier

Executive Boardroom

Defining Data Governance

Data volume, data variety, and data velocity have all grown exponentially over the last few years, the so-called Big Data explosion. And while this increased organizational focus on data, the information it contains, and the insights that can be gleaned from it promises tremendous opportunity, that opportunity isn't achieved without overcoming significant challenges. Whether it be the increased need for better data quality (an issue unresolved from the small data days), more efficient and effective data management, answering questions around data ownership vs. stewardship, or even increased regulatory pressure as a result of data security and data privacy, this increased focus on data has created an increased need for Data Governance. Join our panelists as we discuss the thorny issue of Data Governance: what it is, how it works, why you need it, and who should be responsible for it.

Takeaways:

  • Data management issues have existed as long as data has existed but the Big Data boom has increased these challenges exponentially
  • Resolving data management issues requires a strong data governance program to make rules, resolve issues, and enforce compliance
  • Determining what to about data governance is the easy part, determining how and by whom it should be done will be the real challenge facing IT
 

2:55 pm - 3:20 pm

Executive Exchange

 

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Think Tank

Social Media and Financial Services

Social media is in many ways considered the ?red-headed step-child? of the disruptive technologies that have swept over the industry in the last few years, getting the least attention, being considered the least impactful. Social media however is the furthest thing from a fad in the eyes and minds of consumers and as the technology, and its usage matures, financial services institutions stand to benefit from broader adoption of social media in three ways: driving organic growth, increasing operational efficiencies, and reducing enterprise risk. These benefits cannot be realized without investment of time, money, and effort however and so IT leaders need to look at social media with fresh eyes, and see how these tools can actually drive beneficial change within the enterprise.

Takeaways:

  • Driving customer engagement is a key challenge for all banks and social media, done well, creates the engagement that drives growth
  • Whether through broad-scale marketing programs, streamlined relationship management, or other activities, social media allows banks to rethink and reshape existing processes in ways that are radically more cost effective
  • Information is essential to risk management and the wealth of info shared into social media channels is a gold mine waiting to be exploited


Think Tank

The Evolution of the Private Cloud

Once upon a time applications ran directly on physical hardware. Then the boxes got bigger and more capable and multiple applications were run on the same hardware. There were some resource constraints, but things in general became more efficient. Time passed, things evolved and virtualization was introduced, allowing enterprises to run even more applications even more efficiently on the same hardware. And then the cloud came on the scene, extending the virtualization model to the point that it looked like something completely different, to the point that it became true utility computing. Cloud computing is not just virtualization on a bigger scale and as CIOs prepare their organizations to dive into private clouds at an increasing rate, it is very important to understand what they are and are not, and how they differ from their forbear computer models with which we are all familiar.

Takeaways:

  • Private clouds are big and becoming bigger, but calling something a private cloud and having it actually be one are different things
  • While virtualization may be a core enabling technology of a private cloud, virtualizing an environment doesn't make it a cloud
  • True private clouds have both pros and cons in relation to other compute models; they are not the be-all and end-all and careful consideration needs to be given before pushing ahead with private cloud deployment
 

3:25 pm - 3:35 pm

Afternoon Networking Coffee Break

 

3:40 pm - 4:05 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Innovation Showcase

An exclusive opportunity to be exposed to the hottest new solutions providers in a quick-hit format designed to whet the appetite and spark immediate interest.
 

4:10 pm - 4:35 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Think Tank

Disrupting Markets with Disruptive Technologies

While the combination of Social, Mobile, Analytics, and Cloud have been present and disrupting IT departments and enterprises as a whole for over two years now, in many ways organizations have still not fully embraced them, have still not fully leveraged them. These new platforms allow organizations radically new ways to go to market, allowing for broad scale deployment of systems of engagement that create dynamic relationships with clients and prospects. Finding the resources, wherewithal, and ability to fully commit to these technologies and the capabilities they create has proven to be a struggle for many, but a struggle that can be overcome by leveraging the right partners that bring the right skills and experiences to bear.

Takeaways:

  • Social, Mobile, Analytics, and Cloud are all here to stay; each one adds value to enterprises but collectively that value increases exponentially
  • The manner in which these technologies are implemented, operated, and utilized is different than the foregoing systems of record we are used to
  • Unique skills and capabilities are required to leverage the power and value of these platforms, skills and capabilities that can be in short supply

Think Tank

Cloud Adoption Challenges on a Macro Level

The hype around the cloud is pervasive and can be potentially overwhelming but numerous studies have shown that tangible benefits can be had, whether in cost savings, efficiency improvements, or flexibility enhancements. That said numerous impediments exist to not just realizing that value, but even considering adoption; regulatory issues, integration challenges, business process revamp, and a dozen other challenges can halt cloud projects in their tracks before they get off the ground. In this group discussion we'll explore those inhibitors, understanding which challenges prevent adoption and what can be done to overcome them.

Takeaways:

  • The cloud presents a significant opportunity to organizations and while most have adopted in some form or other, wholesale adoption still lags
  • To realize benefits enterprises must deal with a variety of challenges each one requiring different solutions
  • Industry by industry adoption is constrained for different reasons but do common solutions exist that can resolve issues across the board?
 

4:40 pm - 5:20 pm

Executive Visions

Facilitating Technology-Enabled Business Transformation

The role of the modern IT Executive is more complex than it has ever been before, not just because the technology landscape has become more complex, but also because increasingly IT execs have had to become a business-focused executive, not just a technologist. Long have we talked about the CIO and CISO getting a seat at the table but modern businesses are now demanding that their technology impresario join them and leverage his deep and rich technical acumen to allow the organization as a whole to better position itself for market-place success. To be successful, CxOs need to invest in themselves, in their personnel, and in the right technologies to allow them to position the IT department to proactively address business needs as an innovator and driver, rather than order-taker and enabler.

Takeaways:

  • IT leadership can no longer be simply technology focused, but must instead take their visibility into business process and become business focused
  • A broader business-focus does not preclude maintaining technology excellence however and indeed may demand more of it than ever before
  • Success for CxOs will be measured not in how they can enable enterprise decisions, but in how they can drive growth
 

5:20 pm - 5:30 pm

Thank You Address and Closing Remarks

 

5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Cocktail Reception